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Lawyers

Brian A. Jacobs

Brian A. Jacobs

Partner

New York
212.880.9536

Brian A. Jacobs, a former federal prosecutor, is an experienced trial and appellate lawyer who represents individuals and organizations in criminal, civil, and regulatory matters, internal corporate investigations, and appellate litigation. His cases have involved allegations of financial fraud, antitrust violations, accounting fraud, insider trading, public corruption, and trade-secrets theft.

Brian previously served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York, where he was Deputy Chief of Appeals. During his six and a half years at the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Brian led the investigations and prosecutions of a wide range of federal crimes, including bank, wire, mail, and securities fraud, public corruption, money laundering, obstruction of justice, embezzlement, and cybercrime.

In April 2016, Brian was named a "Rising Star" by the New York Law Journal, which recognizes "attorneys 40 and under who have established a record of accomplishments and demonstrated that they are top contributors to the practice of law and their communities."  The Law Journal acknowledged Brian for handling “an impressive roster of headline-producing cases and successful prosecutions of corruption and other criminal cases” as a federal prosecutor. The Legal 500 United States has recommended Brian in the area of securities litigation, calling him “a superstar.” Additionally, Benchmark Litigation: The Definitive Guide to America’s Leading Litigation Firms & Attorneys recognized Brian as a "Future Star" and named him to its inaugural Under 40 Hot List. Brian is the co-author of “Insider Trading,” a chapter in the treatise White Collar Crime: Business and Regulatory Offenses, and is also a regular contributor to The Insider Blog on Forbes.com.

In his courtroom work at the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Brian successfully conducted nine jury trials, including multiple high-profile public corruption matters and complex white-collar cases. In particular, Brian was a lead prosecutor in the bribery trial of former New York State Assemblyman Eric Stevenson, and also successfully tried the government’s wire fraud and obstruction of justice case against the treasurer and a fundraiser for former New York City Comptroller John Liu. Brian also secured the conviction at trial of a former consultant to the New York City Department of Education for embezzling millions of dollars; the owners of a demolition company for engaging in a large-scale prevailing wage fraud scheme; and a member of a multi-million dollar mortgage fraud ring for bank and wire fraud.

In addition to his successful trial work, Brian is also an accomplished appellate advocate. He personally argued ten appeals before the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and as Deputy Chief of Appeals, he co-authored briefs and supervised oral arguments in more than 50 appellate cases. Brian handled significant appeals from every unit in the U.S. Attorney’s Office, including in cases involving securities fraud, tax crimes, public corruption, terrorism, asset forfeiture, and violent and organized crime. Brian also briefed and argued constitutional law issues before the Second Circuit.

Prior to joining the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Brian was a Law Clerk to the Honorable Amalya L. Kearse of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and the Honorable Jed S. Rakoff of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. He also practiced at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP and Lankler Siffert & Wohl LLP. Brian received his J.D. from Columbia Law School in 2004, where he was an Articles Editor of the Columbia Law Review, was named a James Kent Scholar each year, and was awarded the Paul R. Hays prize for civil procedure and the Charles Bathgate Beck prize for property law. He received his B.A. from Yale College in 2001, cum laude, with distinction in the English major. Brian is a member of the Criminal Advocacy Committee of the New York City Bar Association.